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NBC Nightly News

News/Business. (2012) New. (CC) (Stereo)

NETWORK
NBC

DURATION
00:30:00

RATING

SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel 88 (609 MHz)

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
1920

PIXEL HEIGHT
1080

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 8, Dearborn 4, Nbc 4, Fema 3, Cindy 3, Morsy 3, Janet Shamlian 2, The City 2, Mickey Baker 2, Obama 2, Chicago 2, Missouri 2, Maryland 2, Galveston 2, Jaden 2, San Francisco 2, Janelle Wang 1, Sheryl 1, Raj Mathai 1, Brian Williams 1,
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  NBC    NBC Nightly News    News/Business.   
   (2012) New. (CC) (Stereo)  

    November 30, 2012
    5:30 - 6:00pm PST  

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now, if only we knew who he wa extreme weather in the west, rain, wind, floods, powerful storms and a whole lot of travellers going nowhere fast. and making a difference. tonight, a man who grew up with very little now giving back by giving kids a whole new field of dreams. nightly news begins now. good evening, with every day, every hour that goes by, the clock is ticking down towards some big and costly changes for each and every american family, unless the folks who control washington can act to head it off. it is really a fight over your money, and things like medicare, a majority of americans believe the wealthy should pay more in taxes. that is something the president ran on. and today, he went on the road to push his case. this is all part of a dance that
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has got to end in serious talks and ultimately some compromise to avoid this moment known as the fiscal cliff. with 32 days to go until the make or break point, it is where we begin tonight with our white house correspondent kristen welker, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, president obama tried to sell his plan in the suburbs of philadelphia today. it is a tactic he thinks has worked in the past, but it did very little to sway the congressional republicans. president obama turning up the heat on republicans. >> hello, hatfield. >> reporter: taking his case for higher taxes on the wealthy to pennsylvania today. >> i don't think it is acceptable to you for just a handful of republicans in congress to hold middle class tax cuts hostage simply because they don't want tax rates on upper income folks to go up. >> reporter: speaking at a factory, mr. obama argued that if congress can't get a deal, taxes will rise about $2,000 average for a family.
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of coal you get for christmas, that is a scrooje christmas. >> let's not kid ourselves. >> reporter: house speaker john boehner balked. >> increasing tax rates draws money away from the economy that needs to be invested in the economy to put people back to work. it is the wrong approach. >> reporter: bolder by his re-election, and criticized for being soft on republicans in the past, he drew a hard line, including $1.6 trillion in revenues, $600 billion in additional spending cuts, about half in medicare, and at least $50 billion infrastructure spending. >> we don't want to increase tax rates, we're not going to increase tax rates. and we want to do something about the spending problem. >> reporter: aides say senate minority leader mcconnell laughed after tim geithner showed him the offer thursday.
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today, confl republican goals remain the same, they say, serious entitlement reform, including higher premiums for the wealthy, and increases in the eligibility wage, with the clock ticking, both sides are working. >> all of us will have to get out of our comfort zones to make it happen. >> reporter: now also a part of the president's plan ending congressional oversight of the debt limit, one aide says it is a pipe dream. lawmakers are scheduled to recess in just two weeks, and tonight, brian, the negotiations are deadlocked. >> sooner or later the deadlines have to work out. now, the powerball jackpot. today we got to meet one set of winners but there is mystery surrounding the second winner. nbc kerry sanders with us from the hometown of one very lucky family in dearborn, good evening, kerry. >> reporter: well, good evening,
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the winners, cindy and mark hill, live here, and despite the wins, mark will keep his truck but would like to get a new red camaro. cindy and mark hill say their heads are still spinning. that winning ticket was just one of two to hit the record powerball jackpot. the winnings so large here, cindy, who you see here purchasing the ticket at the convenience store last wednesday can't keep track of how big a cut her family will get. >> how much money did we win? >> i think it is $293 million, at least. >> reporter: it was the day after, cindy was back at the store, checking the numbers. >> i got back in the car, i
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thinking, is that the right numbers? i was shaking, i called my husband, i thought i was having a heart attack. >> reporter: at the local high school gym where students were invited to listen to the story, 51-year-old cindy, who is unemployed, and her husband, mark, who was a mechanic, and out of a job two years ago, shared their love story. high school sweethearts, parents to three children, and mom and dad to jaden, a six-year-old girl they adopted from china. >> jaden, what do you want from christmas? >> a pony. >> reporter: meanwhile, the other ticket sold in arizona may have turned up 2,000 miles away from maryland. this man claims he has a winning ticket. but the lottery computers in maryland are not designed to check out of state tickets. back in the small town in missouri where the hill family says they will remain, there are corrections, information that the jerseys led to the winning numbers was a coincidence. the ticket was a quick pick. >> although we love the royals, so -- >> reporter: oh, and locals have
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made it very clear to everyone this town is not called dearborn. >> dearborn. >> reporter: the family here says they do plan to share the wealth. among the causes close to their hearts, adoption, something that they say they may now do again. brian? >> kerry sanders in dearborn, missouri tonight, thank you. and tonight, a huge weather system is causing trouble on the west coast, bringing heavy rain, lightning and snow to a region that is now really at capacity, and sadly, there is more weather on the way. nbc's miguel almaguer in san francisco for us, where i have noticed the skies are darker behind you over the last hour, miguel. >> reporter: yeah, brian, good evening, after getting hammered by wind and rain today, finally a brief break here after a second powerful storm slammed into the west coast. it seems as though san francisco has really been the bull's eye
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for all of this wet weather activity. take a look at the iconic bay bridge earlier this morning. rain and wind played a big role knocking out power. no bridge lights for commuters for some three hours. and at the airport, 70 flights were cancelled. and there were delays, this turned into a deadly storm. a utility worker was killed after his vehicle turned into a utility pole. in all, some 10,000 people in northern california are without power winds are topping 40 miles an hour knocked down trees from the southern end of the state to the north, some roads are flooded. and before it all comes to an end this weekend, brian, we expect 12 inches of rain and up to a foot or two of snow. sunday forecasters say, could be a disaster, brian.
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>> the surf is unbelievable >> miguel almaguer in the bay area, nasty night for our friends out west, thank you. and back here in the east, he is called the mystery tycoon. but the folks in staten island, new york, are sure glad to have him around. he is giving out bills to victims of sandy. he wants to keep his identity a secret. so no photos of his face. we do know this, he is a businessman from kansas city who plans to give out $100,000 to those who have been hit so hard by this storm. and it has been a long haul for the people of staten island, so many are still suffering. they felt the city was initially slow to send in help and relief supplies. so many are still so desperate that tempers are boiling over. nbc's katy tur is there, good evening. >>eporter: gd ening, t habeth, like they're still being ignored. that is why the emotions came to a head. last night more than a thousand
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people jammed this high school gym to get answers, what they got was a lot more frustration. >> there is a lot of confusion, but a lot of statements and misstatements are being made. >> reporter: officials from the city and fema had organized this town hall in the hopes of easing residents' mounting concerns. instead, they got an earful when the people lashed out. >> we never want to go through this trauma again. >> these people are frustrated, heavy-hearted. okay? lives were lost, my house, i can rebuild a house, my neighbor, he is dead. we need your help, sir. >> reporter: like nearly everyone else here, dee mcgrath is worn out and angry. >> i have dust and mold, where am i supposed to go? >> reporter: today, she was at
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home while spending another night in the cold. >> nobody can live like this, i mean, we are, because we have to. >> reporter: despite the nearly unhabitable conditions, she and her family are living in the two-story bungalow. >> it was freezing, you can feel it now. it was mostly colder here than outside. >> reporter: no heat, no running water, no toilet. they were given money for an apartment by fema, but can't find one, hotels, too far. and local leaders have so far rejected the requests for trailers a month ago, this family was dreaming of a new kitchen. now, they're just trying to stay warm. fema has not forgotten staten island, they have given millions for home repairs. but the problem, brian, many say they just can't find available housing. >> katy tur, staten island, such a wide area remains torn up
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after a month from the storm. >> going overseas now, something that is a familiar sight in egypt today, huge crowds appearing in tahrir square huge crowds protesting in tahrir square, angry at president morsy and his muslim brotherhood, accusing them of hijacking their revolution in their country. and it was hard to miss the large number of women in that crowd today. our chief foreign correspondent richard engel has more from cairo. >> reporter: tens of thousands came, down with morsy, they shouted. leave, leave. what a change for the new egyptian president. just last week, he won praise from mediating an end to the gaza crisis. but then, riding high, morsy shocked the country, declaring his decisions above the law. leaving parliament and the courts virtually powerless. now his loyalists have pushed through a new constitution in a single day. judges call it illegal. but they have been silenced.
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it triggered a wave of protests. the anger is also directed to the united states, people say president obama has gone too far to embrace the muslim brotherhood and has been too quick to praise president morsy, only making him bolder to take this controversial power grab. the demonstrators say the new constitution favors the islamic extremists, and allows citizens to become morality police, and doesn't protect women enough. >> they're trying to ruin the country. this eighteen-year-old student says that the area is dominated by the religious zealots. >>. people threw rocks at me, this is not good, i never felt like that before >> since morsy came to power, do you feel more threatened as a woman? >> yes, i feel much more threatened. >> reporter: egyptians fear that morsy is becoming more of a tyrant than hosni mubarak ever was.
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>> but tonight, brian, it is not looking encouraging for the demonstrators and tomorrow, morsy supporters are holding demonstrations of their own. >> richard engel above tahrir square, where they love using laser pointers when folks are on television. richard, what an amazing turn of events there, thank you for your report. and ahead for us on a friday evening. where the wild things are these days. and later a man whose love of the game is making a big difference along the way.
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we have a report on why so many people across the country's center have been reporting to us from where they live, out-of- nowhere meetings with wild animals, and most cases where they don't have them before. and ofn where they're the last thing you would expect to see. nbc's janet shamlian has more. on where the wild things are ending up >> reporter: at chicago's wrigley field, in the middle of a busy bar neighborhood, two coyotes turned up unfazed by the crowd. >> it is the middle of rush hour, and i live in a very densely populated neighborhood. and there is a coyote near st. louis >> reporter: a wild turkey survived the holiday, only to flaunt its fortune in a walmart parking lot. and bears in the back yard? these days they're coming up to the house. >> i am worried that the bear is
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just a little too aggressive and a little too much for the neighborhood. >> reporter: it is happening everywhere. paved-over cities have long been criticized for crowding out nature, but recently urban environments have become a sanctuary for wild animals. in galveston, texas, they're roaming the neighborhoods. they set traps, but some pets are missing or have been killed, including this chihuahua, nick >> it is just not an area where you think wild animals would be. i mean, this is galveston island. >> reporter: so why is this happening? >> our cities are getting larger, we're moving into their areas, sometimes we leave food out and wildlife is coming in for it. >> reporter: andhey're increasingly coming in. this is where a deer broke into a carpet store. this one stormed a new jersey yogurt shop, in chicago, a sandwich place. >> get away from my cart. >> reporter: they're not always hungry, these turkeys in
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connecticut were simply angry birds. >> it was a gang, literally. coming from the mountains, so be careful, the gang is tough. >> reporter: new neighbors, wearing out their welcome, amid the call of the wild, janet shamlian, nbc news, galveston. got to get along out there somehow. up next, a big change coming from one of the best known consumer products of the last half century. plus, who was that man we took a walk with through grand central today?. you won't take my life.
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you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child transmission. our employees and their families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria, we haven't had a reported case in 12 years. aids is strong. aids is strong. but we are stronger. and aids... ♪ aids is going to lose. aids is going to lose. ♪ mickey baker has died. if you saw "dirty dancing" and if you love the music, you know that fine guitar music was his, he teamed up for the song "love is strange." born poor in louisville, he was working as a dishwasher, went to
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a shop to buy a horn, only had enough money for a guitar, and the rest is history, mickey baker was eighty 7 the musician was eighty-seven. and some things have to change, but this will be a tough one for comics and the bazooka joe comics are going away. they have been wrapped up on every piece of comic history, and you had a small brick of gum in your mouth. sales are down, the brand needs to be more modern. they say the new insert will contain puzzles and activities. we wanted to show you something interesting today, i spent the day with tim cook, the head of apple for an exclusive interview, the first of its kind he ever granted. the conversation will air on "rock center." unlike the man he replaced, he was able to walk across grand central station. once he got to his apple store, that changed, his fans approached and he was treated like a rock star.
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>> we'll preview our interview next thursday night and up next, what is changing kids' lives, thanks in large part to the man who came back to make a difference.
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time now for our friday night "making a difference report," and tonight it is about
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a man who came back to give to kids, where he himself was offered the same freedom to dream big. our "making a difference report" from nbc's ron mott. >> reporter: turning fun into future success is where he spent his time, pushing the sport these youngsters hardly know. he started inner city lacrosse, a nonprofit for kids just like eleven-year-old colby spence. he is already hooked >> i couldn't believe it, they wanted us to join. >> a lot of people can't afford to participate in these activities, and sometimes you find yourself even in that situation. >> reporter: lacrosse, a lot of people think it is an elite sport. >> i think it is, but let's change that. >> reporter: growing up in the shadows of an ivy league tower like the one in new haven,
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yale university, in connecticut, fuelled a burning desire to overcome >> i grew up in the section where they told the yale students not to go. >> reporter: a single mom, youngest of six, he jumped at the chance to get ahead. >> when i walked on the campus, as a little boy, going for enrichment classes, i felt so important, and smart. and so i wanted to introduce that element. >> reporter: so he convinced the equipment-makers to give him free gear, and persuaded lacrosse coaches from yale and his alma mater, trinity college, to help the kids in need of an opportunity. and share their love of the game. >> the same excitement you have for this game is the same excitement you need to have in school. >> reporter: his drive took him just an hour away from his roots, to one of the most prestigious schools in the country. the philips exeter academy. today, as admissions director, he helps to find some of the best and brightest young minds around the world, and hopes to discover even more here. >> that is what i want for the inner city kids, that you can have this imagination.
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yes, you belong. >> reporter: a message heard loud and clear. >> so cool knowing a person who goes here, and then my dream is to go to yale. >> reporter: on a new field of dreams. ron mott, new hampshire. >> there you go, that is our broadcast tonight. and thank you for joining us, as we leave you tonig, a red ribbon, displayed on the north portico of the white house, in advance of tomorrow's world aids day. i'm brian williams, lester ht will be here with you this weekend. of course, we hope to see you back on monday night. meanwhile, please have a good weekend. good night. . >> announcer: nbc bay area news starts now. good evening. thanks for joining us.
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aim janelle wang. >> and i'm raj mathai. round two hit the bay area today and we got hit hard. right now nice break outside, but it won't last long. this friday commute has been surprisingly smooth. sheer aa live look at the 280/880 interchange in the south bay. around the bay area, traffic is moving relatively speaking. >> earlier today, several problems. the heavy rain led to scenes like this across the bay area. flooded parking lots, roadways and freeways, all around a giant mess. >> we have live team coverage, sheryl and mary ann, but we begin with our chief meteorologist jeff ranieri with the latest conditions from our weather center. >> the rainfall totals are unleel. that's what we'll see heading into the weekend's storm system, another round of had heavier rain and also gusty winds. right now most of the activity has pushed off to the south and also to the east so that's good news. some of our kreekz, rivers and streams are going to be able to relax at least a